Food Alternatives – Flavored Salt and Sugar

19Aug08

Flavored Salt and Sugar

Many kitchens fail to see the importance of flavored salt and flavored sugar can bring them – Especially when it comes to something called ‘being unique’. Flavored salt and sugar do not take a long process to produce, and it goes a long way for a restaurant, in terms of branding, competitive advantage over the other, quality of food & service, etc.

Even at home, flavored sugar and salts are handy to use. For flavored salts, you can always add them into ‘light tasting’ savory ingredients like Charred Aust Sirloin Steak in Herb Butter Sauce or Steamed Cod in Superior Sauce and Scattered Almond Flakes. Flavored sugar on the other hand, can go well with desserts like Bread and Butter Pudding or Creme Brulee or Chocolate Souffle; and any ice products like Sherbet. Additionally, you can also do it Jamie Oliver style – Flavored sugar to popcorn.

These styles of making sugar will not involve a very tedious process – As to those with intense flavor has many more processes and take a long time to finish. The idea of these flavored seasoning is to actually seal flavored ingredients into simple seasonings like salt and sugar, while maintaining its use. In most cases, these seasoning provide a great addition to your end-product.

Lemon-flavored Sugar in Mint & Vanilla

Before you start, here’s what you need. A muddle (bartenders use this to make drinks like Mojito), and an air-tight container/jar.

Coarse Sugar – 100g
Mint Leaves – To taste (recommended: Approx 10 nice leaves)
Lemon Rind/Zest – 2 lemons, almost ripened, sliced very thinly (do not chop)
Vanilla Pod – 1 piece, scraped seeds out (If you can’t get pod, use powder.
Cinnamon Powder – 10g

  1. Place everything into a small bowl, with some space on top so that when you muddle them together, it won’t fall off.
  2. Muddle them as you watch oils in the ingredients like mint leaves and vanilla combine.
  3. Muddle until you see the mint leaves are pretty much exhausted. You’ll know when it crushes to a point where it should not be crushed at all, anymore.
  4. You may notice your flavored sugar is a little wet now – You have an alternative: Put it in an oven (open door) with a semi low temperature, or leave it outside to cool in an airy space.
  5. Feel them with your fingers. If they are relatively dry, store them in an airtight container, keep it away from sunlight, heat, rodents, insects and nuisance.

Garlic Infused Masala Salt

Coarse Sea Salt – 70g (reduced in amount)
Masala powder – 20g
Fresh Garlic – 5 cloves (See below on how to prepare)
Kaffir Lime Leaf – 2 leaves, stalk removed, sliced very thinly

  1. As what the above mention (Lemon Flavored Sugar in Mint and Vanilla), the process works the same.
  2. Only this time, you’ve to be extra cautious about your salt – Don’t stir them too long, or small bits dissolve quicker – Especially when you touch them with your hand. Always do this in a cool, airy room.

In order to not allow your garlic to spill too much of its natural oils onto your chopping board, do not chop them with your knife. Instead, slice them gently. This will allow its oil to not spill and retain longer inside – You want the garlic to actually flavor the salt, not your chopping board or knife.

How to use flavored salt and sugar

Although it may be fun producing new items like these at home, knowing what’s best for your ‘seasoning’ may be a tough case to crack. Flavored seasoning are already a medium of preservation and enhancing taste: Now with additional enhancement, it just gets better.

However, blindly placing these flavored seasoning could prove your work worthless. Think this way:

Lightly flavored seasoning for light foods. In order to taste my creation of flavored seasoning, I need to integrate them into foods that will not kill off this smell or only give a very salty or sweet sensation.

For flavored salt, you can use them for:

  1. Seasoning red/white meat prior to grilling, charring, broiling, pan-frying or marinading. For marinading, use this method: If you’re using a Garlic Infused Masala Salt, cover your steak in salt – take a handful of them and cover them wrap salt around it, not sprinkle. After that, leave it in your fridge for approximately 3 hours, remove and wash the salt away with clean water. Cook it with ginger, dried chilly and spring onion (with Kam Hiong sauce). Alternatively, you can also braise the meat.
  2. Topping for extremely hot foods. To make this great, you need practice. Lightly season your steak/cutlets with salt and pepper, cook it (bake, broil, grill, char, sear) and before you remove the meat (after turning off the heat), add these salts and coat them evenly. It will melt and flavor your meat. Be cautious – Your meat may be overseasoned. You will be able to smell the salt from far.
  3. Light-to-bland flavored ingredients like steamed vegetables/fish, shellfish cooked in milk, grilled asparagus, french fries, etc.

For flavored sugar:

  1. Topping for desserts like bread and butter pudding (before baking), flambeed ingredients like Creme Brulee (before torching the sugar into caramel sugar) or topping breads like Cinnamon Roll.
  2. Seasoning for sauces like Poached Pear in Saffron Sauce or accompaniment for purees like Orange Puree and Condensed Milk Sauce or Banana Puree Balls.
  3. Accompany a bread/sweet product (which would probably taste bland at first bite) like a soft rolls and baguettes, or ciabatta (if you really don’t have ingredients to mix with at home).

In many cases, usage of flavored seasoning subjects to your taste, wants and desires. The only rule you need to remember is that these flavored seasoning are made such that it brings out the power of itself in foods to enhance its already robust bouquet or palate.

About these ads


2 Responses to “Food Alternatives – Flavored Salt and Sugar”


  1. 1 Planning a Food Menu at Home « Food & Beverage
  2. 2 Food Alternatives - Alternative Seasoning « Food & Beverage

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: